Episode 25 - Gentrification in Toronto

In this episode, Chris Ramsaropp, Greer Babazon and Nisha Toomey discuss Toronto’s rapid gentrification. We visit the kitchen table to unpack what communities are most impacted by gentrification; explore how gentrification has been, and continues to be, justified by (settler colonial) logics of progress and inevitability; and we speak with a resident of Toronto’s Junction area on the shifted/shifting community.

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Episode 24 - Multiculturism - A Performative Distraction

In this episode, Carey DeMichelis & Bea Jolley delve into the Canadian rhetoric of multiculturalism. The Kitchen Table discusses what multicultural discourses miss and mask. And we are joined by Tiffany King, Assistant Professor at the University of Georgia in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Michael Dumas, Assistant Professor at the University of California, Berkeley in the Graduate School of Education and the African American Studies Department.

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Episode 23 – “How Can I Talk About This Violence Without Being Violent?”: An Interview with Naomi & Belinda

In this episode, Sefanit Habtom and Sigrid Roman interview Naomi Rincón Gallardo and Belinda Kazeem-Kamiński, creators of the Formaldehyde Trip and Unearthing. In Conversation, respectively. Naomi and Belinda generously share their artistic decision-making processes, how they see art as resistance, and speak to future generations of Black and Indigenous peoples.

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Episode #9: Whose Land Interrupted

In this snack episode, Jen Brailsford, Alicia Cameron, and Karima Kinlock disrupt a game show entitled “Whose Land Is It Anyways?” because of the settler colonial and antiblack narratives it perpetuates. Instead, they offer reflections upon what land is and means to Indigenous and Black peoples living on Turtle Island. The episode features a spoken word piece by K.K.Q.

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Episode #8: The Books Episode - Settler Colonialism, Blackness & Land

In this episode, MelisIn this episode, Melissa Wilson and Lynn Ly offer an overview of texts that explore settler colonialism, blackness, and land. This episode hopes to make terms more approachable and accessible by connecting them to current examples. Traveling through history, the present, and into the future, this discussion provides insight into the citation practices that ground our podcast.

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Episode #7: "I don't want to ask you a f'd up question," with Rinaldo Walcott

In this “snack” episode (a shorter episode released between full-length episodes) Rinaldo Walcott and Eve Tuck discuss the dilemmas of posing generous and productive questions between Black people and Indigenous people.  

Walcott reflects on the long practices within whiteness to frame questions in ways that replicate the brutalities of white imposition, and the implications of those frames on questions non-white communities can engage with each other.  

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